New York Yankees Attendance Over Time

New York Yankees attendance 1903-2018

by Luisa Pimentel

New York is known to have one of the biggest cities, best night life, but it is also known as the home of the New York Yankees, their baseball team, formerly known as the “New York Highlanders” when they began in 1903. The graphic above shows us the journey that the New York Yankees have seen in attendance increase and decrease over the years.

Similar to opening up a new business because it usually takes several time to gain actual profit, in the beginning the New York Yankees had the lowest attendance recorded back in 1903. In the first 15 years, the Yankees barely reached almost 500,000 people attended for each of the years during that time frame. It wasn’t until 1946 that the Yankees were able to hit almost 2.3 million attendees. This was during the time when the Yankees demonstrated to have the potential that would lead them to the win the World Series for the 11th time the following year.

With more than 4.2 million people attended, 2008 had the highest attendance recorded for the New York Yankees all time. It must be noted that during this year the Yankees had some of their best players such as Alex Rodriguez, voted MVP two times, and Chien Ming Wang. Both suffered injuries during that time which caused great devastation to the team, according to The New York Times.

The New York Yankees have definitely suffered from the inconstant rate of attendance reported per year. But what is most interesting and inevitable to see is how the year before winning the World Series that follows, their attendance seems to show a pattern of being higher than the actual year in which they won the series. By taking a look at the graph we see this take place in 1946-1947 and 2008-2009.

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